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How is palo alto networks unique from fortinet

how is palo alto networks unique from fortinet

The solution has helped our company stay secure from the security features it provides. "Offers good security and filtering." "One of the nice things about. Comparison of Results: Based on the parameters we compared, Fortinet Fortigate seems to be a slightly superior solution. All other things being more or less. Fortinet and Palo Alto Networks are two of the top cybersecurity companies and compete in a number of security markets, among them EDR and firewalls. WORKBENCH BABY по пятницу два раза. Ответственность,внимательность Обязанности:своевременная делается на до 19:00. Ответственность,внимательность Обязанности:своевременная доставка продукции менее 2.

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Latency Fortinet: 7. Security Effectiveness Fortinet: Overall effectiveness of Our Take As we can see, the technical details favor Fortinet by a slim margin in Firewall. In terms of performance, much can be gained when deploying a solution with specific enterprise needs in mind. To take nothing away from Fortinet: If base latency rates are a key deciding factor for you, this area is worth a closer look.

In any real world head-to-head matchup between these two vendors, however, cost factors into the equation. Pricing varies significantly as you work toward an ideal customer profile, though, so weight the total cost of ownership figure determined by eSecurityPlanet appropriately. In our experience, the cost to implement and maintain a firewall solution is proportionate with the size of the organization, the in-house resources available to support that solution, and the value of the data being protected.

There are several capable firewall solutions available for your enterprise. We realize, however, that aggregating even the most voluminous online resource can only go so far. At CTC Technologies, our team has collectively accumulated decades of experience supporting the cybersecurity needs of startups, small businesses, and large corporations.

While I know why they made the change, they alienated their current client base. Note the number I put. Until they change I probably will not look at another firewall product from them. Are all these posts coming from palo alto employees? I feel like the cli was an afterthought, and lacks polish compared to its competitors. What version of PANos software are you running? There was issues with version 4. I am running 4. In fact I just found this thread while searching to see if I could find anyone else suffering with the same problem.

Plato does make a valid point and innovation is usually backed up by patents. Does PAN have any patents? Is App-ID patented? This discussion could go on forever. Go out and get your hands on a PA firewall, then come back and judge…. Application Identification has been around for quite some time, particularly in the realm of QOS and traffic classification. In fact, I know that L7 filter has been used with Netfilter to do the sort of things these Next-Gen vendors are touting now.

That was back around or that I saw it. It may be a good idea to talk on some outputs of NSS IPS reports that just have been released a couple of days ago. A few of your misconceptions: 1 NGFW! NGFW are new platforms — of which there are few.

Upstream hardware for application awareness that gets pushed down into more hardware for the true security analysis and a one-time deep inspection across all of the security functionality gives them a significant advantage in the heavy lifting. The Astaro was the least expensive. The line between cult and genuine innovation is thin I admit. At the time of the writing, I did not have a lot of experience. I do now.

I still think they are an innovative, interesting company with a solid product that is overplaying their hand on marketing. I think the effect they have on people, such as yourself, is proof enough that they are a cult.

Nobody has ever written a post like yours so passionately defending Sonicwall, Astaro, Fortinet or Juniper. But it is there and astonishing powerful, albeit without less flashy logging and reporting. This is what allows the single pass architecture to work and deliver not only line rate but low latency. Also, lots of security products use FPGAs.

TippingPoint, for example, used them. FPGAs are great for lots of little tasks, but are terrible for complex tasks. The benefit of ASICs is they can be super-optimized to a particular job and therefore operate at much higher speeds.

They both provide the ability to use silicon that is customized to one or some specific applications, which allows them to be much much faster at performing those applications than can be achieved with software running on a general purpose CPU. Con is that they make inefficient use of their transistor count in order to be able to be so flexible.

Cons are that although they can be made to make more efficient use of their transistor count for a specific task than a CPU, they are made up of a small subset of types of logic gates which are used to form the building blocks of the logic that is used to carry out the tasks of their application design. They do not allow arrangement right down to the transistor level. The limitation of those types of gates means that their transistor count is not fully utilized many many gates, made up of many many transistors, are simply not used in ALL FPGA designs by the very nature of how they are used and nor is the arrangement of the transistors used anywhere near as efficiently as ASIC designs.

ASIC: Pro is that ASIC designs are efficient right down to individual transistor arrangements, meaning that the full silicon wafer worth of transistors can be utilized to maximize design efficiency for maximum performance and minimum power usage. The performance capabilities of ASIC designs for a specific task are just stunning. For a specific application, an ASIC design provides by far the highest performance capabilities. Con is that they cannot be amended once burned into silicon, however their tasks are well defined and in this space a lot of the design can be broken down into smaller less complex security related tasks that can be chained together.

Having experience with every firewall discussed here except Checkpoint, I believe your anti-Palo Alto stance is just an ax to grind or you are doing it for one of the other vendors. You play around with words an through your assumptions assume that is ALL Palo Alto is doing and that noting is different here technology wise. Just like politicians I take your comments with a grain of salt. The other thing that separates Palo Alto from the rest besides the user friendly interface and having the logs easily available to you on the box, is how they inspect traffic and how they continue to inspect traffic while the session is still open.

Other firewalls do not do this. Once they allow the traffic they are done with it which is not as secure. That is what the whole bug in their App-ID is about. Of course you can turn off the DSRI and have it continually inspect the stream, but you take a massive performance hit. I like PAN, I like them a lot. I think they are a super cool product.

But that does not mean they are perfect. I think you mistake my analysis with some bigger agenda. I am an industry analyst, and what we do it share our opinions with the community. I respect your right to disagree, of course. Flat out false statement. And it was fixed in 5. If you have a reasonable alternative to PA, please let us know. Cisco or Juniper are a joke and playing catchup, Sonicwall and Fortinet are low-end, Sourcefire costs more for less; who else do you have?

I would not dismiss them so easily. Their purpose is to validate how solid your box works under load and how well it survives. PAN does not survive well due to various architectural reasons. I can recognize that PAN has value, but please take off your blinders and open up to the fact that Fortinet never was just an SMB player. Fortinet is most definitely an enterprise-grade solution and is very much present in the Fortune This is the joke of the decade.

A Frankenstein product! I am heavily involved with big security IT projects and support. For enterprise, I would honestly be cautious. Their application approach is great, but when I check 10 out of 10 big customers I have with their products, what do you see? Policies with ports and no apps. Their sandbox product, wildfire, has more marketing than real results, unlike Fireeye.

On their favor, I like how simple they delivered ssl decryption and their mgmt interface is clean, mature, way better than Fortigate. I would be very careful to place these firewalls in a big datacenter or even a campus and leave their over-engineering code run things on the wild. Anyone who would enable DSRI for outbound web traffic is insane and you do not need to disable this for high throughput on their boxes.

Since then, the cache issue has been resolved and the box has become quite the performance beast. BTW have you looked at their small packet performance? The dedicated management processor is an Intel chip — this is what runs the CLI and WebUI — and it needs to communicate with the datapath processors to apply the configuration to and from them. The datapath processors do the heavy lifting of what the device does — they are general purpose CPUs, but they are network- based general purpose CPUs from Cavium that handle more advanced L4-L7 functions, while the EZ Chip network processor performs any pure L3-L4 stateful inspection firewall functions.

The data sheet value of 20 Gbps was first given several years ago when the product was released, back when DSRI was enabled by default. Actual testing shows the 20 Gbps number is orders of magnitude too high, and proof that customers should verify all data sheet claims. This is not FUD. It is simple testing with an Ixia Breaking Point. If you are a customer of PANW already and you bring someone in to test, you can get a lot of money off a renewal. The world of Politics is spreading into our industry…it is not what you know…it is who.

Sad… in another 20 years this industry will be as poisoned as Real Estate or Wall Street. I also work for a major solutions provider and can tell you that having said employment does not mean you know what all the buzz is about. PAN is dining VPs just as much as other manufacturers from what I can see; it appears to be on par with other large manufacturers when trying to get in with larger enterprises Fortune and below.

This is because a long-term relationship is desired, not a quickie. We like to do bake offs with customers, PAN tends to win every time. Winning bake offs is not synonymous with producing a quality product. Norse won bake offs, look how well that worked out.

I was initially asked to add gateway antivirus and web content filtering to our network in addition to our ASA firewall. I approached the VAR we normally dealt with and they pointed us to WebSense and Iron Port as an alternative , which lead to severe sticker shock we were a heavy Citrix Xen App shop and all the pieces etc I would need to cover that traffic was pricey.

Somehow I stumbled across Palo after that and made the decision to evaluate. Have you ever tried to understand CP licensing? PA releases weekly content updates, regular PanOS dot upgrades, and yearly major version number upgrades, all ascending. The PA products do exactly what the vendor says they do in a way that is easy to manage and understand, this is what makes us recommend them to our peers.

I will agree, Checkpoint licensing is a dark art. Nobody understands it. They have good reason to be. The biggest drawback PA is price for performance. You will be paying more for PA to get the same performance but it more then makes up with all the other features and ease of use.

I suggest download a trail and put in vwire mode in your network and test it and compare it to your firewall to see the features and the ease of us. The threat prevention alone is worth is weight in gold with all the malware out there.

This is laughable and far from the truth. PAN underperforms on throughput, detection, and scalability. The only thing it does is paint a pretty picture with App Prism. Essentially they mastered the sales process but bring little real world value. In that time, Palo Alto Networks contacted us on numerous occasions and asked to meet with us to discuss their offerings.

On each occasion they claimed that only their firewalls were capable of features x, y and z and argued with us when we pointed out that our FortiGates had been performing those features for us for years. Eventually they stopped contacting myself and my Infrastructure manager and instead made direct contact with our CIO, in an attempt to woo him with their BS. Thankfully they got nowhere with that tactic. Our final interaction with PAN was out-of-band with a pen tester who asked if they could install a PAN firewall in transparent mode to perform an Application Visibility and Risk Report.

They earned a recommended rating soon after from NSS. I have found there is a lot of marketing hype from quite a few manufacturers. Some of it bullcorn some of it not. Gartner is kinda hair-brained about this sort of stuff.

I have found a lot of false advertisements and misinformation. Nir Zuk was not the creator nor the principal developer on the state packet inspection firewall. I would say UTM is an additional capability that most vendors have now and are either flow or proxy-based antivirus I think only one vendor has both.

If Palo acknowledges this, they lose the marketing war. So the conversation has stayed on NGFW. I could go into a dissertation here about Fortinet and PAN being sister companies literally born from NetScreen, but that is too much for here. Aso, F5 has is a new competitor in town.

Now, Palo has one of the best interfaces in town. They do some really cool correlation in their GUI and their reporting is top notch. So they make a pretty good device for the mid-market if you put them in-line. If you use them as a reporting tool only they can take on more, but PAN does not stand up under load because of the way they handle fast path vs.

The biggest problem they have is because of Intellectual Property which they are already in hot water for. PAN, because of their engine, needs to push every session out of fast path that does not meet the previous hash for packets. So you introduce enough noise in TCP restarts and UDP congestion notifiers and the box will tip over from process switching all the packets. I did note that Checkpoint just came out with a new gen blade for their series chassis the m That might be able to deal with more firewall in a single chassis.

I will say this, who out there can tell me who writes the antivirus engines for each of the companies or supplies each of them with signatures? That is the real key. You can make all the bad ass looking boxes you want, but unless your threat analysis and forensics are good, your UTM and IPS catch rates are high, your box is useless. That is the reason why FireEye, Fortinet, Checkpoint, and Sourcefire tend to be the choices of the military and government.

Interesting article. I have found that same attitude towards Palo Alto with some of our customers. Marketing seems to be their strongest attribute. Cisco have fallen behind once again. Juniper SRX has been a disaster. SonicWall have made huge advances since Dell dumped money into them, Fortinet are well ahead of the game and Palo Alto are still making headway despite what I would consider an inferior product.

Cisco still playing catch up. Signature based AV and IPS are useful but are based on a dated model that will always be playing catch up with the bad guys. About 6 figures per box if I recall. Fortinet have come into the market with their FortiSandbox.

Not exactly cheap either. Not sure on pricing on this, or anything else with Checkpoint. Not interested due to their horrendous licensing model. Their newest update adds new file types including office docs, pdfs, android apks etc and runs them in both XP and Windows 7 VMs. So it looks like Checkpoint and Palo Alto are the only ones that can do this natively at the moment. Any others? Sandboxing is profoundly CPU intensive. As such, it makes perfect sense to have a separate box or cloud-based version that can make use of dedicated resources.

Sandboxing is part of the Security Analytics market and will converge with the other SA products. That much being said, PAN has made some very savvy acquisitions lately and seems to have some grand vision in the works. So, they can remain a player, but they really need to put their products up for independent testing. Both Palo Alto and Checkpoint firewalls use cloud based analysis for this purpose.

I agree with your other points though. My company used to have pfsense firewalls as the corporate firewall. PAN has a good technology with an amazing Marketing around it. Is this necessarily bad?. PAN irrupted the market with a very strong message of being a revolutionary technology.

They found it the hard way after being hit by cache poison vulnerability. How would unknown applications be handled? Border security follows by nature a positive model and trying to implement it using App-ID is a no go. PAN knows this. As any approach has its pros and cons. Have you seen any decent anti-malware benchmarks where PAN is mentioned?.

First: PAN does suffer performance impact when thread prevention is activated usually drops to half the throughput. See their datasheets. DSRI basically means that traffic going from server to client is not inspected. Guess what? Traffic from server to client tends to be the heaviest part of a communication think about an HTTP request and an HTTP response and is where the malware come. DSRI is enabled by default and is one of the most intentional? Disabling DSRI has a huge impact in performance.

A PA will go from Gbps to 60Gbps. This is public available information. Is an enterprise product one that can go to 10Gbps of thread protection at the best apart from the PA?. Who in their right mind would ever DSRI for web browsing traffic? Are you insane? It could speed up transfer speeds over SMB. Many people develop exploits, like the last ways to bypass a palo alto video, yet they are completely dependent upon misconfigurations of the product.

Also, no, enabling threat prevention does not cut throughput in half as someone had mentioned. If you truly had before, you would have never typed the majority of your comment. I feel Palo Alto has a better web Gui in terms of ease of use. You cant for sure compare with it bluecoats URL filtering capabilities.

Compared to other vendors? Fortinet do it and more in one device. Fortinet, Juniper, Sophos, etc. Check it out here:. The best suggestion I have? Ignore the sales pitch and do your own testing, especially the User-ID design as it has some flaws compared to a traditional proxy SSO design. Just found your article from a while ago so i realize most people wont read this far down on the comments section.

Ease of setup for advanced threats Palo Alto won hands down. Stopping more advanced threats, Checkpoint and Palo Alto. Ease of administration Palo Alto for advanced features Palo Alto again. But when I put all 4 head to head Palo Alto won hands down. I will say this about checkpoint when using them as a traditional Firewall and for a higher throughput solution they will win everytime over Cisco, Fortinet, and Palo Alto.

But I care less about huge throughput and more about security…REAL security not just compliance security. Fortinet is rubbish. Why do you think that is? NSS labs and independent testing group has done ample NGFW tests, and Fortinet routinely comes out on top for performance and accuracy.

Also, a quick check shows Fortinet is on the Common Criteria list. So your data seems wrong. That much being said, Fortinet is by no means perfect. PAN and others can best Fortinet in look and feel and ease of use. PANs traps integration is compelling as well. Even my little SoC2 based 60D at home is an amazing little performer, considering the price point. Can you elaborate on that? The only blatant cheating I am aware of, was from PAN, which they got slated for.

Like Andrew, I agree that Fortinet could do better in some areas. For example, although I am not thrilled with the performance and value of Check Point, their logging is fantastic and I wish Fortinet was as good in that respect I understand Fortinet have or are teaming up with Splunk, so this aspect might get amazing for them.

I have a Palo Alto firewall and I am warning everyone out there to be careful of the hype surrounding them. One slightest incorrect policy and the thing blocks you with no warning, no logic, no error messages, nothing. The appliance is very buggy! The reports are useless and error logging is almost incomprehensible. A packet capture will show the block message, but the web page on the client will hang.

Its the mixed content pages that cause all the problems. Everything is great when the policy complexity is low, but its a nightmare when you introduce any complexity. To say that AppID is just a made up word with nothing behind shows your ignorance. What do you call making policy based on an application signature rather than simply port and protocol?

You are a dolt with a fancy website. The fact that you took time out of your day to write this…proves my point. PAN is a cult, not a firewall. I disagree somewhat even though I have only done a few PA deployments. PA excels in this aspect. No doubt, it has run-of-the-mill specs for everything else, nothing beats PA in terms of having such depth of visibility. Built-in FortiView is enough to see things from a high level though. I guess it boils down to price vs capabilities vs depth of protection.

Overall considering the price point, I still see FortiNet as being the most viable where cost is a concern, else if you have the budget for PA, you should try to get it. FortiNet can still a pretty decent job too, with FortiAnalyzer and good solid configuration. I have only about 60 desktops and around a mobile devices daily. I was given a choice between Fortinet and Pan.

I already wanted the PAN beforehand after looking at the traffic visibility. When I was given the pricing I said fuck Fortinet. Who said it was cheaper? They need to start looking into re-pricing it more competitively else more customers will start leaving Fortinet. Any Fortinet employees here? Perhaps you are right, but Palo Alto is not the only company that plays those dirty tricks.

In the ads the card almost flew. We forced the provider to turn-off a card on the fly and…. All TCP flows were lost. After that Cisco said that particular version of software had a bug that affected the operation of the wonder-feature, but soon it would be fixed. I cannot remeber how many years passed to get the feature fixed.

You must be logged in to post a comment. View open positions. Gil on January 6, at pm. Log in to Reply. Duane on July 16, at pm. Dave Klein on January 6, at pm. Dave Klein Log in to Reply. Florian Heigl on March 2, at am. Agnusstick on January 10, at am.

John on January 6, at pm. Ian Lyons on January 7, at am. Special Sauce lettuce cheese pickles onions on a ….. This is the coolest thing to happen in networking in quite some time, but for a reason! Bill Frank on January 7, at pm. Andrew Plato on January 7, at pm. Bill Frank on January 8, at am. James on January 11, at pm.

Maginot on April 20, at pm. Stefan Brunner on July 2, at pm. Todd A. Maginot on January 7, at pm. Bort on January 8, at pm. Anyway, keep up the good work and the blog. I always enjoy hearing your thoughts on security. Alex on January 9, at am. Most of the forthcoming input is based mainly upon Cisco and Checkpoint experience: ———————— The Palo Alto inspection engine is unique and superior to anything out there. In all fairness: I am not qualified to comment on the VPN capabilities and platform however, as I do not currently use that aspect of the product.

The Juniper Lawsuits? Anony Mouse on January 24, at pm. PAN lovers, keep buying into the marketing so hackers have easier networks than mine to target. Dioactive on January 25, at am. Kevin on February 1, at pm. David g on February 24, at pm. Andrew Plato on February 24, at pm. Bob Williamson on April 19, at pm. Bob Log in to Reply. Andrew Plato on April 19, at pm.

Bob Williamson on April 20, at pm. Firewall User on April 30, at am. So out of the box with price for performance and feature set we ranked them as follows: 1. Ben on May 2, at pm. Gilbee on July 21, at pm. Dendre on December 28, at am. Mark on September 21, at pm. That is a shame, since the product itself is quite nice otherwise. SecWiz on June 10, at pm. Xclude on June 22, at am. Go out and get your hands on a PA firewall, then come back and judge… Log in to Reply.

Jim Greene on July 11, at pm. Burak on August 4, at am. Catch rate? DJM on October 8, at pm. Andrew Plato on October 8, at pm. Cyber Tao on July 22, at pm. Andrew Plato on July 22, at pm. Shane on March 5, at pm. Sorry, but this distinction is just wrong. Duane Hensley on August 1, at am. Just my two cents worth.

How is palo alto networks unique from fortinet teamviewer uninstall tool

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Upstream hardware for application awareness that gets pushed down into more hardware for the true security analysis and a one-time deep inspection across all of the security functionality gives them a significant advantage in the heavy lifting. The Astaro was the least expensive. The line between cult and genuine innovation is thin I admit. At the time of the writing, I did not have a lot of experience.

I do now. I still think they are an innovative, interesting company with a solid product that is overplaying their hand on marketing. I think the effect they have on people, such as yourself, is proof enough that they are a cult.

Nobody has ever written a post like yours so passionately defending Sonicwall, Astaro, Fortinet or Juniper. But it is there and astonishing powerful, albeit without less flashy logging and reporting. This is what allows the single pass architecture to work and deliver not only line rate but low latency. Also, lots of security products use FPGAs.

TippingPoint, for example, used them. FPGAs are great for lots of little tasks, but are terrible for complex tasks. The benefit of ASICs is they can be super-optimized to a particular job and therefore operate at much higher speeds. They both provide the ability to use silicon that is customized to one or some specific applications, which allows them to be much much faster at performing those applications than can be achieved with software running on a general purpose CPU.

Con is that they make inefficient use of their transistor count in order to be able to be so flexible. Cons are that although they can be made to make more efficient use of their transistor count for a specific task than a CPU, they are made up of a small subset of types of logic gates which are used to form the building blocks of the logic that is used to carry out the tasks of their application design.

They do not allow arrangement right down to the transistor level. The limitation of those types of gates means that their transistor count is not fully utilized many many gates, made up of many many transistors, are simply not used in ALL FPGA designs by the very nature of how they are used and nor is the arrangement of the transistors used anywhere near as efficiently as ASIC designs.

ASIC: Pro is that ASIC designs are efficient right down to individual transistor arrangements, meaning that the full silicon wafer worth of transistors can be utilized to maximize design efficiency for maximum performance and minimum power usage.

The performance capabilities of ASIC designs for a specific task are just stunning. For a specific application, an ASIC design provides by far the highest performance capabilities. Con is that they cannot be amended once burned into silicon, however their tasks are well defined and in this space a lot of the design can be broken down into smaller less complex security related tasks that can be chained together.

Having experience with every firewall discussed here except Checkpoint, I believe your anti-Palo Alto stance is just an ax to grind or you are doing it for one of the other vendors. You play around with words an through your assumptions assume that is ALL Palo Alto is doing and that noting is different here technology wise. Just like politicians I take your comments with a grain of salt. The other thing that separates Palo Alto from the rest besides the user friendly interface and having the logs easily available to you on the box, is how they inspect traffic and how they continue to inspect traffic while the session is still open.

Other firewalls do not do this. Once they allow the traffic they are done with it which is not as secure. That is what the whole bug in their App-ID is about. Of course you can turn off the DSRI and have it continually inspect the stream, but you take a massive performance hit. I like PAN, I like them a lot. I think they are a super cool product. But that does not mean they are perfect.

I think you mistake my analysis with some bigger agenda. I am an industry analyst, and what we do it share our opinions with the community. I respect your right to disagree, of course. Flat out false statement. And it was fixed in 5. If you have a reasonable alternative to PA, please let us know. Cisco or Juniper are a joke and playing catchup, Sonicwall and Fortinet are low-end, Sourcefire costs more for less; who else do you have? I would not dismiss them so easily.

Their purpose is to validate how solid your box works under load and how well it survives. PAN does not survive well due to various architectural reasons. I can recognize that PAN has value, but please take off your blinders and open up to the fact that Fortinet never was just an SMB player. Fortinet is most definitely an enterprise-grade solution and is very much present in the Fortune This is the joke of the decade.

A Frankenstein product! I am heavily involved with big security IT projects and support. For enterprise, I would honestly be cautious. Their application approach is great, but when I check 10 out of 10 big customers I have with their products, what do you see? Policies with ports and no apps. Their sandbox product, wildfire, has more marketing than real results, unlike Fireeye.

On their favor, I like how simple they delivered ssl decryption and their mgmt interface is clean, mature, way better than Fortigate. I would be very careful to place these firewalls in a big datacenter or even a campus and leave their over-engineering code run things on the wild. Anyone who would enable DSRI for outbound web traffic is insane and you do not need to disable this for high throughput on their boxes.

Since then, the cache issue has been resolved and the box has become quite the performance beast. BTW have you looked at their small packet performance? The dedicated management processor is an Intel chip — this is what runs the CLI and WebUI — and it needs to communicate with the datapath processors to apply the configuration to and from them. The datapath processors do the heavy lifting of what the device does — they are general purpose CPUs, but they are network- based general purpose CPUs from Cavium that handle more advanced L4-L7 functions, while the EZ Chip network processor performs any pure L3-L4 stateful inspection firewall functions.

The data sheet value of 20 Gbps was first given several years ago when the product was released, back when DSRI was enabled by default. Actual testing shows the 20 Gbps number is orders of magnitude too high, and proof that customers should verify all data sheet claims. This is not FUD. It is simple testing with an Ixia Breaking Point. If you are a customer of PANW already and you bring someone in to test, you can get a lot of money off a renewal. The world of Politics is spreading into our industry…it is not what you know…it is who.

Sad… in another 20 years this industry will be as poisoned as Real Estate or Wall Street. I also work for a major solutions provider and can tell you that having said employment does not mean you know what all the buzz is about. PAN is dining VPs just as much as other manufacturers from what I can see; it appears to be on par with other large manufacturers when trying to get in with larger enterprises Fortune and below. This is because a long-term relationship is desired, not a quickie.

We like to do bake offs with customers, PAN tends to win every time. Winning bake offs is not synonymous with producing a quality product. Norse won bake offs, look how well that worked out. I was initially asked to add gateway antivirus and web content filtering to our network in addition to our ASA firewall. I approached the VAR we normally dealt with and they pointed us to WebSense and Iron Port as an alternative , which lead to severe sticker shock we were a heavy Citrix Xen App shop and all the pieces etc I would need to cover that traffic was pricey.

Somehow I stumbled across Palo after that and made the decision to evaluate. Have you ever tried to understand CP licensing? PA releases weekly content updates, regular PanOS dot upgrades, and yearly major version number upgrades, all ascending. The PA products do exactly what the vendor says they do in a way that is easy to manage and understand, this is what makes us recommend them to our peers. I will agree, Checkpoint licensing is a dark art. Nobody understands it. They have good reason to be.

The biggest drawback PA is price for performance. You will be paying more for PA to get the same performance but it more then makes up with all the other features and ease of use. I suggest download a trail and put in vwire mode in your network and test it and compare it to your firewall to see the features and the ease of us.

The threat prevention alone is worth is weight in gold with all the malware out there. This is laughable and far from the truth. PAN underperforms on throughput, detection, and scalability. The only thing it does is paint a pretty picture with App Prism. Essentially they mastered the sales process but bring little real world value.

In that time, Palo Alto Networks contacted us on numerous occasions and asked to meet with us to discuss their offerings. On each occasion they claimed that only their firewalls were capable of features x, y and z and argued with us when we pointed out that our FortiGates had been performing those features for us for years.

Eventually they stopped contacting myself and my Infrastructure manager and instead made direct contact with our CIO, in an attempt to woo him with their BS. Thankfully they got nowhere with that tactic. Our final interaction with PAN was out-of-band with a pen tester who asked if they could install a PAN firewall in transparent mode to perform an Application Visibility and Risk Report.

They earned a recommended rating soon after from NSS. I have found there is a lot of marketing hype from quite a few manufacturers. Some of it bullcorn some of it not. Gartner is kinda hair-brained about this sort of stuff. I have found a lot of false advertisements and misinformation. Nir Zuk was not the creator nor the principal developer on the state packet inspection firewall. I would say UTM is an additional capability that most vendors have now and are either flow or proxy-based antivirus I think only one vendor has both.

If Palo acknowledges this, they lose the marketing war. So the conversation has stayed on NGFW. I could go into a dissertation here about Fortinet and PAN being sister companies literally born from NetScreen, but that is too much for here. Aso, F5 has is a new competitor in town.

Now, Palo has one of the best interfaces in town. They do some really cool correlation in their GUI and their reporting is top notch. So they make a pretty good device for the mid-market if you put them in-line. If you use them as a reporting tool only they can take on more, but PAN does not stand up under load because of the way they handle fast path vs. The biggest problem they have is because of Intellectual Property which they are already in hot water for.

PAN, because of their engine, needs to push every session out of fast path that does not meet the previous hash for packets. So you introduce enough noise in TCP restarts and UDP congestion notifiers and the box will tip over from process switching all the packets.

I did note that Checkpoint just came out with a new gen blade for their series chassis the m That might be able to deal with more firewall in a single chassis. I will say this, who out there can tell me who writes the antivirus engines for each of the companies or supplies each of them with signatures? That is the real key.

You can make all the bad ass looking boxes you want, but unless your threat analysis and forensics are good, your UTM and IPS catch rates are high, your box is useless. That is the reason why FireEye, Fortinet, Checkpoint, and Sourcefire tend to be the choices of the military and government. Interesting article.

I have found that same attitude towards Palo Alto with some of our customers. Marketing seems to be their strongest attribute. Cisco have fallen behind once again. Juniper SRX has been a disaster. SonicWall have made huge advances since Dell dumped money into them, Fortinet are well ahead of the game and Palo Alto are still making headway despite what I would consider an inferior product.

Cisco still playing catch up. Signature based AV and IPS are useful but are based on a dated model that will always be playing catch up with the bad guys. About 6 figures per box if I recall. Fortinet have come into the market with their FortiSandbox.

Not exactly cheap either. Not sure on pricing on this, or anything else with Checkpoint. Not interested due to their horrendous licensing model. Their newest update adds new file types including office docs, pdfs, android apks etc and runs them in both XP and Windows 7 VMs. So it looks like Checkpoint and Palo Alto are the only ones that can do this natively at the moment.

Any others? Sandboxing is profoundly CPU intensive. As such, it makes perfect sense to have a separate box or cloud-based version that can make use of dedicated resources. Sandboxing is part of the Security Analytics market and will converge with the other SA products.

That much being said, PAN has made some very savvy acquisitions lately and seems to have some grand vision in the works. So, they can remain a player, but they really need to put their products up for independent testing. Both Palo Alto and Checkpoint firewalls use cloud based analysis for this purpose.

I agree with your other points though. My company used to have pfsense firewalls as the corporate firewall. PAN has a good technology with an amazing Marketing around it. Is this necessarily bad?. PAN irrupted the market with a very strong message of being a revolutionary technology. They found it the hard way after being hit by cache poison vulnerability. How would unknown applications be handled? Border security follows by nature a positive model and trying to implement it using App-ID is a no go.

PAN knows this. As any approach has its pros and cons. Have you seen any decent anti-malware benchmarks where PAN is mentioned?. First: PAN does suffer performance impact when thread prevention is activated usually drops to half the throughput. See their datasheets. DSRI basically means that traffic going from server to client is not inspected. Guess what? Traffic from server to client tends to be the heaviest part of a communication think about an HTTP request and an HTTP response and is where the malware come.

DSRI is enabled by default and is one of the most intentional? Disabling DSRI has a huge impact in performance. A PA will go from Gbps to 60Gbps. This is public available information. Is an enterprise product one that can go to 10Gbps of thread protection at the best apart from the PA?.

Who in their right mind would ever DSRI for web browsing traffic? Are you insane? It could speed up transfer speeds over SMB. Many people develop exploits, like the last ways to bypass a palo alto video, yet they are completely dependent upon misconfigurations of the product. Also, no, enabling threat prevention does not cut throughput in half as someone had mentioned.

If you truly had before, you would have never typed the majority of your comment. I feel Palo Alto has a better web Gui in terms of ease of use. You cant for sure compare with it bluecoats URL filtering capabilities. Compared to other vendors? Fortinet do it and more in one device. Fortinet, Juniper, Sophos, etc. Check it out here:.

The best suggestion I have? Ignore the sales pitch and do your own testing, especially the User-ID design as it has some flaws compared to a traditional proxy SSO design. Just found your article from a while ago so i realize most people wont read this far down on the comments section.

Ease of setup for advanced threats Palo Alto won hands down. Stopping more advanced threats, Checkpoint and Palo Alto. Ease of administration Palo Alto for advanced features Palo Alto again. But when I put all 4 head to head Palo Alto won hands down. I will say this about checkpoint when using them as a traditional Firewall and for a higher throughput solution they will win everytime over Cisco, Fortinet, and Palo Alto. But I care less about huge throughput and more about security…REAL security not just compliance security.

Fortinet is rubbish. Why do you think that is? NSS labs and independent testing group has done ample NGFW tests, and Fortinet routinely comes out on top for performance and accuracy. Also, a quick check shows Fortinet is on the Common Criteria list. So your data seems wrong. That much being said, Fortinet is by no means perfect.

PAN and others can best Fortinet in look and feel and ease of use. PANs traps integration is compelling as well. Even my little SoC2 based 60D at home is an amazing little performer, considering the price point. Can you elaborate on that? The only blatant cheating I am aware of, was from PAN, which they got slated for.

Like Andrew, I agree that Fortinet could do better in some areas. For example, although I am not thrilled with the performance and value of Check Point, their logging is fantastic and I wish Fortinet was as good in that respect I understand Fortinet have or are teaming up with Splunk, so this aspect might get amazing for them.

I have a Palo Alto firewall and I am warning everyone out there to be careful of the hype surrounding them. One slightest incorrect policy and the thing blocks you with no warning, no logic, no error messages, nothing. The appliance is very buggy! The reports are useless and error logging is almost incomprehensible. A packet capture will show the block message, but the web page on the client will hang.

Its the mixed content pages that cause all the problems. Everything is great when the policy complexity is low, but its a nightmare when you introduce any complexity. To say that AppID is just a made up word with nothing behind shows your ignorance. What do you call making policy based on an application signature rather than simply port and protocol?

You are a dolt with a fancy website. The fact that you took time out of your day to write this…proves my point. PAN is a cult, not a firewall. I disagree somewhat even though I have only done a few PA deployments. PA excels in this aspect. No doubt, it has run-of-the-mill specs for everything else, nothing beats PA in terms of having such depth of visibility.

Built-in FortiView is enough to see things from a high level though. I guess it boils down to price vs capabilities vs depth of protection. Overall considering the price point, I still see FortiNet as being the most viable where cost is a concern, else if you have the budget for PA, you should try to get it.

FortiNet can still a pretty decent job too, with FortiAnalyzer and good solid configuration. I have only about 60 desktops and around a mobile devices daily. I was given a choice between Fortinet and Pan. I already wanted the PAN beforehand after looking at the traffic visibility. When I was given the pricing I said fuck Fortinet.

Who said it was cheaper? They need to start looking into re-pricing it more competitively else more customers will start leaving Fortinet. Any Fortinet employees here? Perhaps you are right, but Palo Alto is not the only company that plays those dirty tricks. In the ads the card almost flew.

We forced the provider to turn-off a card on the fly and…. All TCP flows were lost. After that Cisco said that particular version of software had a bug that affected the operation of the wonder-feature, but soon it would be fixed. I cannot remeber how many years passed to get the feature fixed. You must be logged in to post a comment. View open positions.

Gil on January 6, at pm. Log in to Reply. Duane on July 16, at pm. Dave Klein on January 6, at pm. Dave Klein Log in to Reply. Florian Heigl on March 2, at am. Agnusstick on January 10, at am. John on January 6, at pm. Ian Lyons on January 7, at am. Special Sauce lettuce cheese pickles onions on a …..

This is the coolest thing to happen in networking in quite some time, but for a reason! Bill Frank on January 7, at pm. Andrew Plato on January 7, at pm. Bill Frank on January 8, at am. James on January 11, at pm. Maginot on April 20, at pm. Stefan Brunner on July 2, at pm. Todd A. Maginot on January 7, at pm. Bort on January 8, at pm. Anyway, keep up the good work and the blog.

I always enjoy hearing your thoughts on security. Alex on January 9, at am. Most of the forthcoming input is based mainly upon Cisco and Checkpoint experience: ———————— The Palo Alto inspection engine is unique and superior to anything out there. In all fairness: I am not qualified to comment on the VPN capabilities and platform however, as I do not currently use that aspect of the product.

The Juniper Lawsuits? Anony Mouse on January 24, at pm. PAN lovers, keep buying into the marketing so hackers have easier networks than mine to target. Dioactive on January 25, at am. Kevin on February 1, at pm. David g on February 24, at pm. Andrew Plato on February 24, at pm. Bob Williamson on April 19, at pm. Bob Log in to Reply. Andrew Plato on April 19, at pm. Bob Williamson on April 20, at pm. Firewall User on April 30, at am.

So out of the box with price for performance and feature set we ranked them as follows: 1. Ben on May 2, at pm. Gilbee on July 21, at pm. Dendre on December 28, at am. Mark on September 21, at pm. That is a shame, since the product itself is quite nice otherwise. SecWiz on June 10, at pm. Xclude on June 22, at am. Go out and get your hands on a PA firewall, then come back and judge… Log in to Reply.

Jim Greene on July 11, at pm. Burak on August 4, at am. Catch rate? DJM on October 8, at pm. Andrew Plato on October 8, at pm. Cyber Tao on July 22, at pm. Andrew Plato on July 22, at pm. Shane on March 5, at pm. Sorry, but this distinction is just wrong. Duane Hensley on August 1, at am. Just my two cents worth. Andrew Plato on August 1, at am. Thanks for the feedback Duane. Jacob on October 18, at am. Andrew Plato on October 19, at pm.

SomeFortinetGuy on December 19, at pm. Njr on February 4, at am. Mike on January 29, at pm. James on January 29, at pm. But still slow compared to Fortinet… BTW have you looked at their small packet performance? Experienced on August 12, at pm. I work for a large IT solutions provider and can tell you what the buzz is about. Also Experienced on August 7, at pm. Andrew Plato on August 8, at am. Allen Ratcliff on September 17, at am.

Rob on October 30, at pm. Andrew Plato on October 30, at pm. Mike on August 8, at am. Dan on March 3, at pm. Shane on March 8, at am. I loathe Palo Alto Networks for their consistently dishonest behaviour. What are Secure Web Gateways? Read More. Introduction: SASE features and evaluation criteria The stampede to remote work has finally reversed into a slow migration of employees back to the office.

SASE is a concept brought to the market by Gartner. Our market guide series has included a mix of mature but retooled and new product categories but paradoxically, XDR is a blend of old wines in new bottles. If you need to ask a question, please use our form to connect with their presales team. Please complete the form to ask a question or send a message directly to Fortinet.

N etify have carefully curated global sales contacts based on your IP location. If you do not receive contact, please check your junk folder. Contact Fortinet. Please complete the form to ask a question or send a message directly to Palo Alto Networks. Contact Palo Alto.

How AI is changing cybersecurity for IT decision makers? Artificial intelligence is the new technological frontier. The more you look at new technologies Cybersecurity requirements for Financial Services companies. Cyberattacks are on the rise, and the costs and impacts of ransomware, data breaches, and other See All Articles. No thanks. What are the differences between Fortinet and Palo Alto? Want to find out which vendors or service providers match your business needs?

Take our quiz to get your unique personal suggestions. Who is Fortinet? LAN including secure ethernet switching, security driven wireless and FortiAIOps which delivers dynamic visibility and increased network speed using AI. Leveraging these products allow you to have a secure LAN edge without the need for high priced and complex subscriptions.

Palo Alto Networks have a purely security based product offering and only offers next-generation firewalls both hardware and virtual network equipment. Fortinet realizes that the most common form of access to a network is via Wi-Fi. With this in mind, their wireless equipment leverages security-driven networking to provide secure wireless access. Wireless controllers are available in both physical and virtual form factors. In September , Palo Alto revealed their secure Wi-Fi 6 home access point, the Okyo Grande, pre-integrated with their cybersecurity threat intelligence solution.

The target audience for this product is the increased number of employees who are now working from home and require a secure connection into their enterprise environment. In addition, the Okyo is capable of having multiple networks configured so multiple users in the same household can take advantage. Following their virtual offering approach, they offer wireless network controllers to monitor and secure your IoT devices through third-party providers such as Aruba and Cisco.

FortiSASE provides secure access for user's and applications wherever at any time, without having to rely on legacy VPN-only solutions. Allowing for seamless integration of applications regardless of location, unlock cloud-scale savings to reduce WAN costs, and ensure high performance access whilst maintaining industry-leading security. Customers can upgrade legacy routers with smarter, lightweight appliances wherever and enable integrated 5G and Zero Touch Provisioning capabilities reducing the hours needed for manual, labor intensive provisioning.

This is largely due to an autonomous approach to simplify network operations with automatic problem avoidance, powered by their AIOps and machine learning. Fortinet customer support Palo Alto customer support Technical support is available via their FortiCare service. This also provides customers with return merchandise authorization RMA , 24x7 toll-free call centres in every geographical region and online web chat for instant answers.

User reviews show that as the company grows the quality of support is increasing, which is good to see. Palo Alto Network support services provide extended resources to help enterprises with protecting and optimising their infrastructure.

Customers can choose from three plans, these being standard, premium and platinum. Fortinet managed services Palo Alto managed services Fortinet does not directly offer managed services but they provide MSSP partners with the means to do so. These partners reduce risk and minimize the impact of cyberattacks by providing managed security and monitoring technologies.

Available services include; managed firewalls, intrusion detection, VPN and vulnerability scanning. Only offering managed services through an MSSP partner, customers can reap the benefit of easier deployment, support from security professionals, streamlined tasks, incident management and interactive proactive investigations.

Their main product offering, NGFW, can be deployed either physically or virtually. Allowing for whatever requirements to be met. Multiple guides and best practices for completing deployment can be found on their website. These guides are filled with images providing step-by-step instructions.

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